jobonga massage & natural therapies

MASSAGE AND DAY SPA CENTER IN PLANO TX

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Frequently Asked Questions

I offer online scheduling using BookFresh 

How can therapeutic massage help me?
bullet How does massage help with stress?
bullet How does massage help my painful and tight muscles.
bullet Can massage help to relieve soreness after I workout?
bullet What about the pain and tingling in my arms and legs?
bullet I was recently injured. What can massage do?
bullet What about secondary pain?
bullet Can massage prevent new Injuries from occurring?
bullet My joints don't seem to be as strong as before. Can massage get my range of motion back?
bullet I have terrible posture. Can massage help?
bullet I see a chiropractor once a week, do I really need a massage therapist too?
bullet I recently was hurt and unable to do regular activities. Now I'm weak and unable to do anything. How can massage help me?
bullet I have a problem with fluid retention. What can massage do?
What is a massage like?
bullet What are some types of massage?
bullet What is a Massage Therapist, and is a masseur the same thing?
bullet What is my first appointment like?
bullet What do I wear?
bullet What should I do during the massage?
bullet How does a massage feel?
bullet How long is a session?
bullet How often should I go?
bullet What should I expect afterwards?
bullet Is massage always safe?

 

Q. How does massage help with stress?

 

A. Massage can provide you with more energy. More energy can improve your way of thinking, or outlook on life, thus greatly improving your quality of life and how you feel about your well-being. It can also relieve the symptoms that cause stress, such as muscle tension, anxieties over physical ailment, work related stress and some emotional duress. It also gives you a break to focus on yourself, and how you're feeling. After a while, massage helps you realize the signs and symptoms of stress so that you can stop it before it gets to far. Because massage has been known to relieve stress, it is great for people in psychological counselling or treatment for an addiction.

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Q. How does massage help my painful and tight muscles.


A. Massage can help relieve many muscle tensions from a stiff neck to sore wrist from typing all day to a clenched jaw. By using stretching and kneading strokes, tension is often released. Some forms of massage such as Shiatsu and Thai massage works on the underlying source of the condition as it relates in the Traditional Chinese theory of medicine. 

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Q. Can massage help to relieve soreness after I workout?

 

A. Yes That muscle soreness is called DOMS—Delayed onset Muscles Soreness. After you workout vigorously, waste tends to build up in your muscles, This is called lactic acid build up. This build up can leave your body feeling tired and sore. Massage can increase the circulation, which bring nutrients to the sore spots and remove the build up, leaving you refreshed and rejuvenated.

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Q. What about the pain and tingling in my arms and legs?

A. Often our muscles can get so overly contracted that they can push on our nerves. This sends a painful tingle down our arms or legs. With a couple of sessions to loosen the muscle up you should be fine.

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Q. I was recently injured. What can massage do?

A. Massage can usually help heal things like tendonitis, strains or sprains. Massage reduces the inflammation in the area and increases circulation, flushing the toxins out and bringing in nutrients. Massage can also be helpful for disk injuries as well, but you must first consult a doctor before pursuing treatment. Massage has been known to help increase range of motion in a joint after an injury has occurred as well, like Frozen Shoulder Syndrome. Certain massage techniques can actually limit the amount of scar tissue formed and can break down existing scar, tissue making it more pliable.

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Q. What about secondary pain?

A. Some times after doing something for a long time our bodies start to over compensate leaving a secondary pain such as a headache from staring at a computer screen or low back ache from pregnancy or strain from favouring a specific muscle group. Massage can help relieve these symptoms too.

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Q. Can massage prevent new Injuries from occurring?

A. By reducing chronic tension, there is less chance of muscles being injured. If they aren't strained and relaxed they are less likely to be injured.

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Q. My joints don't seem to be as strong as before. Can massage get my range of motion back?

A. Yes. Beside working the muscles around the joint, many therapists work on the joint itself, stretching and putting it through range of motion, as well as stimulating circulation to that area, providing a natural lubricant for your joint. It may also help relieve pain of osteoarthritis.

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Q. I have terrible posture. Can massage help?

A. Yes. By getting tension out of strained muscle and joint and surrounding fascia, your body can return to a more natural posture. Massage may also relieve contracted muscle and pain caused by abnormal curvatures such as scoliosis.

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Q. I see a chiropractor once a week, do I really need a massage therapist too?

A. Chiropractors are skilled at realigning your skeletal structure. A massage therapist is skilled at dealing with the muscles that hold your skeleton in place. If your bones aren't where they should be it's very possible that the muscles are too tight and are pulling them that way. Massage therapists and chiropractors usually work hand in hand. They do the bones we do the muscles. Massage can actually help you keep your chiropractic treatments longer.

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Q. I recently was hurt and unable to do regular activities. Now I'm weak and unable to do anything. How can massage help me?

A. Sometimes life throws huge turns and we are unable to do usual activities. In other words, we're forced to a life without activity. Massage again can relieve the aches and pains, increasing circulation to skin and muscles. Many times a therapist can help you go through range of motion so that you retain at least some muscle. Overall massage can provide you with relaxation during this time of hurt and recuperation.

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Q. I have a problem with fluid retention. What can massage do?

A. Massage increases circulation which can drain the body of unwanted fluid such as in an injury or pregnancy. There is also a massage technique called lymphatic drainage that assists the lymph system of getting rid of unwanted toxins from the system.

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Q. What are some types of massage?

A. Massage is in high demand and has been used for years. There are many types. The ones we specifically do are relaxation, remedial, sports, deep tissue, prenatal-postnatal, shiatsu, traditional thai, lymphatic drainage, facial. See the section on my services for more complete descriptions of each. 

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Q. What is a Massage Therapist, and is a masseur the same thing?

A. A few years ago people who practiced massage were known as masseuses or masseurs. However, that name nowadays is typecast for people who do other things beside therapeutic massage.  A massage therapist must have completed a set number of hours of certified training in their modality of bodywork, anatomy and physiology courses, as well as the indications and contraindications for massage. In Texas, a therapist must complete a certified program and complete a certain number of hours of practical work. The massage therapist must be licensed by the state in order to practice in a massage clinic. The massage clinic also goes through a lengthy registration process were all people involve in the business are scrutinized. It is only after the state is fully satisfied that a licence is awarded to the clinic.

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Q. What is my first appointment like?

A. Usually you should come about 5 minutes early to fill out health forms. This also gives you and the therapist time to get to know each other and find the best method of treatment. Sometimes the therapist may want to do some simple muscle testing to see what may be causing the problems. Always be open and honest about your medical history so your therapist can provide you with the best quality of service.

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Q. What do I wear?

A. Depending on the type of service you are receiving you may or may not undress. For many massages techniques it is advisable that you undress to your underwear, women removing bras so that straps do not get in the way. The therapist will drape you with a clean sheet and often a blanket. The part of the body that is to be worked on will be the only part exposed. Genitals are never exposed or massaged at any time.

You will relax on a padded table that may or may not have other cushions supporting you. The room is generally softly lit with relaxing music. For many of the techniques a lubricant is used—oils or lotion that will absorb into your skin making it soft and supple.
A massage generally starts with light gliding strokes to warm the muscles and calm the mind. As the massage progresses the stroke will be deeper. If at any time during the massage the pressure is not enough or too much, inform your therapist and they will change to met your needs. Sometimes with deeper work you may experience a “hurt so good" feeling. This is not to be confused with pain. In order to break up some adhesions there may need to be some slight discomfort, but this just goes away after a short time. Inform the therapist about what you are feeling. The phrase "no pain, no gain" does NOT apply to massage.


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Q. What should I do during the massage?

A. Make yourself comfortable. The massage therapist will move whatever needs to be moved (arm or leg), or will instruct you on what to do if necessary. Many people simply close their eyes and relax. Some people like to talk. Do whatever makes you comfortable. It at any time the room is too cold or hot, the music isn't right, or the lubricant irritates your skin, let the therapist know. They are there to serve YOU!

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Q. How does a massage feel?

A. Massaging a healthy tissue feels good. To most, It allows the body to relax. Some people are surprised to find that it isn't ticklish. Sometimes an area may feel tender and you didn't even know it was sore. Other areas may be ticklish. Again the phrase "no pain, no gain" does NOT apply to massage. It should feel good, or maybe slightly uncomfortable for a short period, but that should go away quickly. If not, let the therapist know if the pressure is too much or not enough.

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Q. How long is a session?

A. Sessions usually run from an hour to 90 minutes. Jobonga sessions starts at one hour and can last up to 3 hours. 

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Q. How often should I go?

A. Depending on what goals you want to accomplish, once a week or twice a month is sufficient. Sometimes if you're in chronic pain, twice a week for a couple of weeks, then once a week for a couple of weeks, then twice a month. If your schedule is very constricting, once a month at least. Generally, whenever you can come is best.

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Q. What should I expect afterwards?

A. When the massage is completed, always take your time getting up. You may feel slightly dizzy. This will pass shortly. Many people feel rejuvenated and ready to start their day again. Some are tired and want to sleep. If really deep work has been done, you may feel slightly sore but this will go away and you will feel fine in an hour or two. You may not feel anything until later in the day and suddenly feel free. One thing you should be aware of is to drink plenty of WATER for the next day or two following a massage. Massage can increase circulation by breaking up toxins in your body and restoring it with nutrients. Your body needs to get rid of those toxins. So don't be surprised if you have some sniffles, sneezes or slight flu-like symptoms. It's your body's way for healing itself to make you stronger.

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Q. Is massage always safe?

A. No. There are certain things that need either special attention or must be avoided at all times. Talk to your therapist about what they can and cannot do. If they can't help you, they may be able to find someone who can. Always be open and honest with your therapist about medical issues.

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